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Debt process server laws may be changing

Jun 19, 2012 Philip Burgess

Debt process server laws may be changing
The debt collection industry employs a number of process servers who file, retrieve and serve legal documents to debtors. In an effort to further regulate the practice, the Process Serving Standards Summit will be held in July.
 Develop industry-wide standards With an eye toward creating voluntary standards for those who serve debtors on behalf of recovery agencies, InsideARM reported, JJL Process Corporation decided to hold the first annual event. According to the meeting's website, it will be held from July 10 - 11 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Denver, Colorado. InsideARM reported JJL president Scott Levine said they are holding the discussions in a preemptive effort to protect workers in both the collection and serving industries. "What we hope to accomplish at the Process Serving Standards Summit is to innovate the industry with carefully thought out standards. We want to show that we can be good stewards of the courts' and the publics' trust," Levine said to the source. Changes expected Every point within the current Voluntary Process Serving Standards for the Collection Industry will be examined and debated by the attendees of the event, according to InsideARM. The discussions may result in a change or alteration of the current laws. Levine told the source most of the regulations in place currently are too basic and do not account for new technologies and insurance industry developments. As it stands now, the VPSS glosses over the most important features of the process serving career as it relates to the recovery sector. It does detail certain operations that must be performed. For example, Part B of the rules indicates the server must provide GPS verified, time or date-stamped evidence the notification was served to the individual. However, other sections, such as Section 2 of Part B, which says that the evidence must be "Stored for X number of years due to re-opened judgements," are not only vague but could result in problems if all in the industry do not follow the exact same rules. The new rules will affect servers, recovery agents and their respective attorneys in terms of compliance and accountability, in particular, Levine noted. Changes may also result in a higher quality of work and an edge on the competition for those who follow the practices.